Short Story: Nightshade and Pomegranate, Part One

“Demeter, what if he comes for her?”

“Come? Here? He’s the God of Death, would he dare walk the halls of Olympus and cross me?”

Demeter turned to the nymph, her round face and dark eyes looked down with smoldering fury and annoyance. Her lips pulled in a tight line, curled downward at the sides. Her hand pulled to her hair, pushed a strand behind her ear. Demeter’s eyes flicked around the room, scanned the other gods in attendance, deities that she had known since their births, since the destruction of the Titans, and since Zeus had taken his throne over them all. They had all come tonight in anticipation of who her daughter, Persephone, would choose as her king.

Gathered in the room were the bachelors that Demeter had chosen: Ascelpius, Hermes. She had even invited married Olympians who despised their wives like Hephaestus, which drew the criticism and interest of the rest of the gods who now stood in the halls of the sprawling manor, filling it with the murmurs of their words.

“All of the men of Olympia are here,” a feminine voice said.

“All of the bachelors except for one,” another, masculine chided.

Aphrodite looked to Eros, a gleam in her eye. “Demeter can try what she may, but you and I can feel the tug between her daughter and the God of the Underworld. I can’t blame Demeter, her daughter, the Goddess of Spring, so overflowing with life; to watch her wither away at the side of Death himself.”
“Would she wither?” Eros asked, a finger pulled to his puckered lips in sincere thought. “Or would she become something new?”

“Persephone’s change to anything other than her mother’s babe will be like withering in Demeter’s eyes,” Aphrodite said, watching Demeter and her devoted nymph, Minthe, talk to one another in fevered, hushed pitches.

“Where is the woman of the night, anyway? Where is Persephone?”

“Probably out in the gardens. That girl is always looking for a rose bush to talk to, Calypso even said Persephone told her that she prefers to talk to flowers than the rest of Olympia. What a strange lady.”

Persephone was outside in the gardens, joined by Calypso who watched as Persephone’s hands cultivated a rosebush three times larger than a naturally occurring bush.

“Your gifts, Persephone,” Calypso said, cupping a large rose in her hand and
taking in its scent. “What a gift to Earth you are.”

Persephone smiled softly, but it soon faded from her face, She took her friend’s hand into her own. “Calypso, I don’t want to be here.”

“I know, Persephone,” Calypso said. “Have you considered talking to Zeus about taking a spot with Athena, Hestia, and Artemis as a virginal Goddess?”

“Yes,” Persephone said. “I want to take that virginal pledge as much as I want to be here, at this courtship party.”

Calypso wrapped Persephone in a hug, putting her head on her shoulder. “I know that who you love is not here but your mother, the rest of Olympia… they’ll never accept your love for one another.”
“Then I don’t want live here, in Olympia with them. I’ll live in the Underworld, with him!”
“What will happen to you there?!” Calypso said, her words fast and scared. “What what happen to the Goddess of Spring, the embodiment of burgeoning life, when she lives in the Underworld of the dead for eternity?”

Persephone turned away, pulling out of her friend’s embrace. “I would rather die in the Underworld with my love, than live here, dead already.”

“You speak with no regard,” Calypso said, rolling her eyes.

“I speak with no regard?!” Persephone asked, her eyes throwing darts at her friend.

“No, you don’t,” Calypso said. “Your mother is here to set you up with a respectable suitor and you’re moaning about it! You walk the land with mortals, you understand what their lives are like! Hard, and rough. Not like your existence, not like here.”

“Calypso, I thought you of all would understand what it was like to have love ripped from you,” Persephone said, her voice tight with sorrow.

“The fates set that dream straight,” Calypso said, her voice heavy with relived torment. The sadness she had felt releasing Odysseus, and telling him how to build a ship to sail away washed over her again. As did the pain as she watched Odysseus leave, knowing he was to return to his true love. The anguish that even the body of a Goddess was not enough to sway a mortal man from his wife had ripped anew, an old, ever existent wound.

“The fates,” Persephone said, ruminating on the thought. “Are they here? They would know the truth of what’s to happen. They can guide me tonight.”

“I didn’t see them –” Before Calypso could say anything further a large commotion echoed from inside the manor. The voices of gods and goddesses clamored among one another, creating a torrent of sound.

Calypso ran to the doorway to see what caused the excitement. Her soft steps carried her through the manor, a large crowd gathered in the center of the foyer. A hand snatched her arm, she turned her head back to find Zeus holding her. Her eyes widened, her legs shook. A smile spread across his face.

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Short Story: Dejavu – Part 5 Finale


“This is where you want dropped off?” The truck driver asked, his eyes peering down from his opened window. Rain pelted the eighteen-wheeler, dripped down into the man’s console controls. The truck was pulled over to the side of the road, its hazard lights blinking in the fog from the storm. The driver’s eyes scanned across the forest surrounding the rural road.

“Yup,” James said. He stood outside of the driver’s door, a broad smile across his face.

“I can’t imagine why you would want to be dropped off here,” the man said. “There’s not a soul in sight.”

James just smiled at the man and waved to him. “Thank you man, I really appreciate the ride.”

The truck driver shook his head, waved back, and pulled back onto the road. As the man pulled away, James’s constant migraines immediately subsided. James felt the man’s thoughts stretch like taffy and dislodge out of his mind as the man drove. It had finally happened. The silence had come. No more would James be plagued by floating thoughts of anyone surrounding him. No more would he have to hide in his tiny, dark apartment in a giant city, where the windows were tapped shut so he couldn’t see anyone outside. Never again would his home be barraged by people begging for him to push himself past the brink.

No cars came down the dirt road in the fifteen minutes James soaked in the silence. It was the first time in James’s life that all he could hear was the rain, and he sobbed. He sobbed for both the relief he felt by being completely alone and the loneliness that he would have to relegate himself within for the rest of his life. This was not the first time he had to flee, every time word would spread about his abilities he’d pick up and move, hoping to learn from his past mistakes and manage to live a normal life in society. Now, for the first time, he saw the truth. People would always try to take from him more than he could give. He could never be around them again.

Alone. Alone was the only way he’d survive now. With his own two hands in solitude.


Thank you all for sticking with me through this short story! I will be submitting this for publication soon, and thus this series will only be up on my blog for a limited time. I will begin a new short story next Wednesday!

Short Story: Dejavu – Part Two

Come back every Wednesday, I have these scheduled for upload now!

“Really?” A man said, suddenly doubled over in laughter, his hand keeping him steady against the marble topped island counter in the kitchen.

His wife, removing her cat-eye spectacles to rub her eyes with the palms of her hands in frustration, let out a heavy sigh and a light chuckle herself. “I’m overthinking it, right?” she asked.

He stood up, putting a hand on her shoulder. “Beth, honestly, you’re taking it too seriously. You basically got your hand read by a crackpot fortune teller. You put stock in your daily horoscope, too?”

Bethany left out a small laugh. “I know, Brian. Just being told that, and the look on his face, the look in his eye, you should’ve seen it. You should’ve seen how he ran out of the office, and I… I was almost in shock from the experience; I didn’t even try to stop him.”

Brian took her into his arms, pulling her into his body. “Make sure to have your admin reach out to him for an appointment. The poor guy needs help, even if he did creep you out.”

Bethany tilted her head against his chest, taking in the scent of his cologne. Her eyes watched the birds outside eating at a hanging feeder in the kitchen window. “Yeah, I will, it’s still pretty wild, though, getting told you’re going to die soon. Hit by a car while looking at a key on the ground, like, where would that even happen?” Beth felt a rush of reassurance over her, her tightened shoulders slung easy to her sides, and she exhaled, letting go of the stress.

“Listen, don’t think about it, how many other times have people said insane things?” He leaned down and kissed her cheek. “Let’s head out, wouldn’t want our seats to be given up.”